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140 years ago this May 20th, Jacob W. Davis and his partner Levi Strauss were granted US Patent #131,191 which “consists in the employment of a metal rivet or eyelet at each edge of the pocket-opening, to prevent the ripping of the seam at those points.”

And thus the core technology at the root of the timeless cool of the blue jean was born.


Happy 140th anniversary to Levi Strauss & Co.


From top:

A girl posing in Levi’s blue jeans. (Photo by Co Rentmeester//Time Life Pictures/Getty Images)

CIRCA 1957: EXCLUSIVE Portrait of American actor Kim Novak sitting in the large open window of a stone house, California. Novak is wearing a low-cut work shirt, jeans and cowboy boots. (Photo by Murray Garrett/Getty Images)

Tony Curtis (1925-2010), US actor, wearing a paid of blue denim jeans, bare-chested as he pulls on a red-and-black plaid shirt, circa 1955. (Photo by Silver Screen Collection/Getty Images)

An advertisement for Levi Strauss & Co’s copper-riveted overalls, circa 1875. The hard-wearing garments were very popular with miners in the American West. (Photo by Hackett/Archive Photos/Getty Images)

UNITED STATES - AUGUST 08: Cowboys rest hands on knees as they await a turn at the rodeo, Ridgway, Colorado (Photo by James L. Amos/National Geographic/Getty Images)

Seven naval officers, four bare-chested, dancing on the beach around a line drawing of a naked woman in red light, in a publicity still issued for the film, South Pacific’, 1958. The musical, written by Richard Rodgers (1902–1979) and Oscar Hammerstein II (1895-1960), was directed by Joshua Logan (1908-1988). (Photo by Silver Screen Collection/Getty Images)


Click through to see more images of folks in blue jeans…

Happy 140th, Levi’s!

On the nightstand this week:Shopping for Good by Dara O’Rourke

Damn, I love me a hopeful pragmatist. In Shopping for Good, O’Rourke confronts the hard questions that hover over the encouragement of ethical consumption. Instead of taking the tired, over-enthused stance of “this is how you can help!” O’Rourke is realistic in delving deep into the issues that surround why we, as a society, purchase the way we do.

Acknowledging the imperfections of the current global supply chain, she doesn’t so much offer suggestions as she does hard facts. There is no act of consumer-guilting involved. It’s great. Her approach allows the reader to actually grasp his or her placement in the global market and - instead of merely thinking, “Hey, I read a book and know what to do now!” - maintains a sort of open-endedness where the reader can fill in the gaps as it applies to their very personal life and worldview.

This acts as a preface to the second half of the book, where a forum of eight experts explore these issues a step further, asking where we should entrust our efforts in market regulation, and honing in on the major challenges in “…making global supply chains fair and sustainable.”

On the nightstand this week:
Shopping for Good by Dara O’Rourke

Damn, I love me a hopeful pragmatist. In Shopping for Good, O’Rourke confronts the hard questions that hover over the encouragement of ethical consumption. Instead of taking the tired, over-enthused stance of “this is how you can help!” O’Rourke is realistic in delving deep into the issues that surround why we, as a society, purchase the way we do.

Acknowledging the imperfections of the current global supply chain, she doesn’t so much offer suggestions as she does hard facts. There is no act of consumer-guilting involved. It’s great. Her approach allows the reader to actually grasp his or her placement in the global market and - instead of merely thinking, “Hey, I read a book and know what to do now!” - maintains a sort of open-endedness where the reader can fill in the gaps as it applies to their very personal life and worldview.

This acts as a preface to the second half of the book, where a forum of eight experts explore these issues a step further, asking where we should entrust our efforts in market regulation, and honing in on the major challenges in “…making global supply chains fair and sustainable.”